Moore Bros. Jamestown, NY Felling Saw No. 7

Ohlen-Bishop, Dunham, Carrigan & Hayden, and saws with department and hardware store markings like Montgomery Ward.
bradpj53
PostsCOLON 5
JoinedCOLON March 19th, 2017, 10:57 am

Moore Bros. Jamestown, NY Felling Saw No. 7

Post by bradpj53 » March 23rd, 2017, 1:51 pm

I live about a 2 hour drive from Jamestown, NY (hometown of Lucille Ball!), where this saw was made a hundred or more years ago it seems. Moore Bros. was in business there actively producing saws and files from 1868 - 1914 at least, under 3 generations of family ownership. According to a forum post on Sawmill Creek, Atkins bought out their saw line, and even offered Moore Bros. saws in their catalog for awhile.

I found this at an antique dealers, it was labeled NOS and that it came from a hardware store in Jamestown (perhaps gone out of business sale). It clearly has not been used. It is 3.5" from back to tip of teeth, is six feet long and has an arched back, but is not tapered. The etching is very had to read but also says "Cold Spring Steel".

Brad Johnson
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dayle1960
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JoinedCOLON July 31st, 2014, 11:33 am
LocationCOLON Bella Vista Arkansas

Re: Moore Bros. Jamestown, NY Felling Saw No. 7

Post by dayle1960 » March 23rd, 2017, 2:21 pm

The tight gullets between the cutters is an oddity. The shape of the tips of the cutters reminds me of a hard wood felling saw, yet the length of the cutters reminds me of a soft wood felling saw. Which makes me wonder...if you purchased this saw in upstate NY, then it must have lived its life in that area. So what kind of trees are indigenous to that area, soft or hard wood?

bradpj53
PostsCOLON 5
JoinedCOLON March 19th, 2017, 10:57 am

Re: Moore Bros. Jamestown, NY Felling Saw No. 7

Post by bradpj53 » March 25th, 2017, 3:14 am

Most of western NY state forests are less than 100 years old, due to extensive pre-1900 intensive cutting for industry and land clearing for farming. The are is also hilly in areas such as mine due to glacial effect, with hardwoods giving way to softwoods with a couple hundred feet of elevation change. So, a mixed-use saw makes a lot of sense I guess.

Brad

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