D Handle

Got a question? New to the forum? Feel free to post your questions here.
User avatar
trailcrew
PostsCOLON 370
JoinedCOLON February 16th, 2011, 9:47 am
LocationCOLON Asheville, NC

D Handle

Post by trailcrew » March 24th, 2013, 7:54 am

Been trying to manufacture some new "D" handles for saws. Most of the woodworking is fairly straightforward, but I've been having trouble cutting the kerf in the handle to accept the saw plate. I've been using the narrowest kerf table saw blade I can come up with and it still results in a loose fit. Any other ideas?
Josh

User avatar
PATCsawyer
PostsCOLON 693
JoinedCOLON February 19th, 2011, 5:27 am
LocationCOLON Northern Michigan

Re: D Handle

Post by PATCsawyer » March 24th, 2013, 9:09 am

I use small hand saw with the blade flat against a guide board. Takes some experimentation. That's the first cut I make after I rough out a handle, as I've failed (drifted off center) on a few and would just as soon fail early in the process.

User avatar
Jim_Thode
PostsCOLON 755
JoinedCOLON June 28th, 2012, 9:34 am
LocationCOLON Onalaska, Washington State, USA
CONTACTCOLON

Re: D Handle

Post by Jim_Thode » March 24th, 2013, 9:39 am

A band saw sawmill works good. If you don't have one, I'm sure there are a few near you.
Jim

goodfeller
PostsCOLON 508
JoinedCOLON April 20th, 2011, 8:24 am
LocationCOLON Northern Virginia

Re: D Handle

Post by goodfeller » March 25th, 2013, 8:38 am

Here is a link I posted a while back to a site that shows how to make a gig for a table saw to cut the groove; it is for a handsaw but the principle is the same: www.wkfinetools.com/tMaking/art/ramJackson.

Another technique is a variation on PATCSawyer's--I think. You take an old saw blade--preferrably the same thickness as the one you are making the handle for--and attach it flat to a piece of wood half (actually a bit less than half) the thickness of your handle stock with about half the blade exposed. You then clamp the board and blade flat to your bench and slide the handle stock back and forth along it to start your groove. You then put the handle stock in a vise and finish the groove with a back saw. This takes longer than a band saw but is fairly foolproof which is a real plus for me. You also don't need a bandsaw. There are some pictures of this technique at www.clanperez.com/Wood/WoodDocs.htm. You can probably just Google Tim Hoff or Making Saw Handles. Again, this is for handsaws but principle is the same.

Diabolo
PostsCOLON 149
JoinedCOLON September 20th, 2012, 2:05 am
LocationCOLON France

Re: D Handle

Post by Diabolo » March 26th, 2013, 1:03 am

Slotting the handle cleanly has always been a concern for me. Difficulty mainly comes from the ratio thickness / lenth of the kerf. A bandsaw will tend to get out of track if too much pressure is applied. The ideal solution (industrial) is a circular saw, 8-10" fitted horizontaly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_qf9QGHfBg
(go to 2.53 mn)

My solution is a homemade blade (7 ppi rip, 8° rake, 0.8mm thick for 1mm kerf, this is for handsaws) fitted horizontally , the tote is adjusted in height and dragged against the teeth. The mounting has flat irons acting as depth stops. This gives good results, and providing the pressure against the teeth is not too heavy, the kerf is generated very cleanly and dead straight.

Yves
Attachments
DSC04310.JPG
DSC04313.JPG

goodfeller
PostsCOLON 508
JoinedCOLON April 20th, 2011, 8:24 am
LocationCOLON Northern Virginia

Re: D Handle

Post by goodfeller » March 26th, 2013, 5:26 am

Tres elegante. This is similar to one of the ones I posted but much easier to see/understand. Thanks.

User avatar
trailcrew
PostsCOLON 370
JoinedCOLON February 16th, 2011, 9:47 am
LocationCOLON Asheville, NC

Re: D Handle

Post by trailcrew » March 26th, 2013, 6:51 am

That's a really elegant solution. So to modify it for d handle timber saws, I just need to locate a saw plate filed for rip with enough set to create a kerf of the desired width? There's the rub. I need to learn how to sharpen handsaws.

By the way, I really like the handle added to move the saw tote safely back and forth along the saw plate. I already have visions of me raking my hand along a sticky sharp handsaw blade. Cringe worthy.
Josh

Diabolo
PostsCOLON 149
JoinedCOLON September 20th, 2012, 2:05 am
LocationCOLON France

Re: D Handle

Post by Diabolo » March 26th, 2013, 9:11 am

Thanks for your kind comments.
Yes trailcrew, you'll have to find a blade with the proper set or make one. But I think you should avoid to give more than 0.1mm (0.004") set per side, the trick is to guide the blade as much as possible in the slot. This way, the blade is stiffer and more stable. So for creating a 2mm wide kerf, you'll have to select a 1.8mm steel sheet.
Sharpening rip teeth is not that difficult, as far as there is no fleam... 7 ppi seems to be the good compromise: it is rather slow to cut, but not to agressive. Is is important not to tear out the sides of the slot, especially at the start.

Matt Cianci who kindly explained me the method, demonstrates a lighter version of the process on his blog:
http://thesawblog.com/

I also used to make a peripheral cut with a cheap small circular saw. It has a roller bearing that limits the depth. The kind of tool for router. And then I'd finish the slot with a handsaw. The peripheral cut guides the handsaw and avoid tears too.

Hope it helps...

Yves
Attachments
DSC04314.JPG

Gavin Longrain
PostsCOLON 663
JoinedCOLON May 17th, 2012, 10:51 am
LocationCOLON Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland
CONTACTCOLON

Re: D Handle

Post by Gavin Longrain » June 27th, 2020, 2:03 pm

Here is blog of my process:
https://www.shedtherapy.com/making-d-handles/

I attach a template for the D handle
D handle large.pdf
(52.06 KiB) Downloaded 4 times
z five handles drying (1).jpg
d drill 26 mm Ø hole (1).jpg
h handle in jig for bandsawing slot (1).jpg

BUTTON_POST_REPLY